Climate change exposes children to lifelong health harm: Doctors

By Canadian Press	
	 		Today’s babies won’t know life without climate change new report warns				Nov 13 2019

By Canadian Press Today’s babies won’t know life without climate change new report warns Nov 13 2019

The report is also accompanied by a policy brief for Indian lawmakers. Global temperature has already increased by 1 degree celsius above pre-industrial levels, a United Nations report said previous year. "The rise in average temperature is putting the health of Canadians at risk". The increased frequency is why more than half of the 448,444 Canadians evacuated due to wildfires between 1980 and 2017 were displaced in the past decade.

"All countries need to take action, and in particular high-income countries, and the actions we are proposing make sense for our health and make sense economically".

In addition to anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists preterm birth, low birth weight and maternal complications as potential consequences of "intensely stressful" exposure to extreme weather. "Wildfire smoke also travels vast distances and increases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations".

But emissions proceed to rise 12 months on 12 months, placing Earth on a path that might result in a 4C temperature rise by the tip of the century - bringing peril for human well being. Sea levels are now rising at an ever concerning rate.

Researchers said the 600 per cent increase in the use of electricity and biofuels for transport since 2000 has so far been insufficient, as it accounts for less than four per cent of the energy used. It said that climate impacts would be exponentially more in a 2 degree warmer world compared to a 1.5 degree warmer world.

It may be slow and incremental, but it is progress when it comes to tackling climate change.

According to the study, in 2016, the US health-care sector produced almost 1,800 kilograms of Carbon dioxide equivalent per capita, with the next biggest producer, Japan, contributing around 1,000 kilograms per capita, though this represents a 37 per cent increase from 2007. Local weather change is already harming individuals' health by growing the variety of excessive climate occasions and exacerbating air pollution, in line with an annual examine printed on Thursday in The Lancet medical journal.

India's PM 2.5 levels are the in the world and nine times the World Health Organization's safe limit, making India one of the most polluted countries in the world.




"Fossil fuel consumption is at the heart of health care's emissions", said Dr. Jean Zigby, a Montreal-based family physician who serves on the board of directors of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment (CAPE). To dramatically reduce emissions by 2050, and to meet multiple Sustainable Development Goals, India must transition away from coal and towards renewable energy.

Extreme floods in Venice, fires in Australia and even an outbreak of plague in China have been attributed to climate change this week, while researchers have warned that global warming could saddle future generations with a life-long illness.

Dr. Cindy Parker, an environmental health professor at Johns Hopkins University, praised the peer-reviewed report, which she wasn't part of, but she anxious that focusing on the health effects that have already happened lessens the urgency of the future.

Those diseases hit children harder. The Countdown's food security indicators show that over the past 30 years, increases in global temperature have reduced the planet's crop yield, with a 4% reduction reported for key crops such as rice and maize.

Climatic suitability for the Vibrio bacteria that cause cholera is rising three per cent a year in India since the early 1980s, said the report.

As children grow older, the impact of air pollution is only poised to worsen.

The number of Canadians exposed directly to wildfire averaged 35,300 between 2001 and 2004, but 54,100 between 2015 and 2018.

Upon tracking political engagement, The Lancet Countdown found that national leaders, particularly from small islands and developing states, are increasingly drawing attention to health and climate change at the UN General Debate.

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