Announcement

Results of ExxonMobil Endangered Species and Conservation Programme Documentary Making and Poster Design Competition 2016

The Exxon Mobil Endangered Species and Conservation Programme aims to increase public biodiversity and conservation awareness of Singapore and Southeast Asian biodiversity. Sponsored by Exxon Mobil, participants get to attend a customised workshop on Southeast Asian biodiversity conservation, and do their part in spreading conservation awareness.

Endangered species and conservation design

Secondary school participants are encouraged to take positive action and spread the conservation message by taking part in a documentary making competition. Last year, we showcased the first batch of winners for the documentary making competition. This year we will highlight documentary making competition winners for 2016.

These videos showcase the winners of the documentary making competition in the Secondary School category.

 

First place: River Valley High School, Group 9, featuring the Asian elephant. The team members are: Tan Li Qing, Lee Si Ning and Moo Jia Rong.

Second place: Dunman High School, Group 4, featuring the Bornean orangutan. The team members are: Amber Rose Pillay, Yap Tze Hiang, Poh Anna and Vidonia Tan Ting Yen.

Third place: Damai Secondary School, Group 8, featuring the Asian elephant. The team members are: Lim Jelene, Nicole Lee Wire, Phyllis Poh Lay Suan and Chelsea Teo.

We hope that these videos will encourage everyone to learn more about Southeast Asian conservation and its issues.

For more information about the Exxon Mobil Endangered Species and Conservation Programme for primary and secondary schools, contact nhmlearning@nus.edu.sg.

 

Results of ExxonMobil Endangered Species and Conservation Programme Poster Design Competition 2015–2016

The ExxonMobil Endangered Species and Conservation Programme aims to increase public biodiversity and conservation awareness of Singapore and Southeast Asian biodiversity. Sponsored by ExxonMobil, participants get to attend a customised workshop on Southeast Asian biodiversity conservation, and do their part in spreading conservation awareness.

Primary school participants share what they learnt to their peers via a poster making competition. We hereby congratulate the winners of the poster making competition for 2015 and 2016. Due to programme constraints, the poster making competition for 2015 and 2016 were held concurrently. The animals to be featured for 2015 and 2016 were given out randomly to participants to ensure fairness.

Here are the winners of the poster making competition in the Primary School category for 2015:

First place: Convent of the Holy Infant Jesus (Kellock), Group 4, featuring the Tiger. The team members are: Shanyce Goh, Kimberly-Jeon Goh, Tan Ing Jya and Ysabelle Wong Sze

Second Place: Clementi Primary School, Group 9, featuring the Sumatran Rhinoceros. The team members are: May Phyu Thwe, Kong Shi Ting, Zeth Tay Cao Hui, Chloe Lim En Jia.

Third Place:  Pei Chun Public School, Group 9, featuring the Tiger. The team members are: Kai Wong, Jenell Lee, Gabriel Lee and Su Zhixuan.

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2015 First Place poster by CHIJ (Kellock) on the Tigers

 

The winners of the poster making competition in the Primary School category for 2016.

First Place: Geylang Methodist School (Primary), Group 7, featuring the Sumatran Rhinoceros. The team members are: Ng Yao Yi Marcus, Cassia Tay Kaixin, Wong Ke Ying and Heng Zheng Yu Thomas.

Second Place: Clementi Primary School, Group 3, featuring the Singapore Freshwater Crab. The team members are: Sharma Simran, Xu Rulin and Ethan Lee Yee Chien.

Third Place: Pei Chun Public School, Group 2, featuring the Singapore Freshwater Crab. The team members are: Renne Goh Xin Ru, Yeo Le Xuan Desiree, Leow Xin Yi and Shirlyn Woo She Leng

Geylang Methodist Pri Gp 7

2016 First Place poster by Geylang Methodist (Primary) on the Sumatran rhinoceros.

We hope that these posters will encourage everyone to learn more about Southeast Asian conservation and its issues.

For more information about the Exxon Mobil Endangered Species and Conservation Programme for primary and secondary schools, contact nhmlearning@nus.edu.sg.

Swimming Ashore

Oceanic Inspirations

Whale Picture on Lawn

The wooden whale on the lawn near LKCNHM. Photo by Tan Heok Hui.

Have you visited us recently?  For those who have, you may have noticed a whale sculpture on the lawn near the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM) signage just before you enter the museum.

Ever wondered what the story is behind the sculpture?   

When news of the dead sperm whale emerged last July, a team from LKCNHM was dispatched to salvage its remains. The sperm whale came to be known as Jubilee as she was found on Singapore’s golden jubilee year, SG50.The carcass of the female sperm whale from Jurong Island was to trigger a flurry of actions ranging from tributes, features and pledges of support for the whale to become a major exhibit within LKCNHM. 

Older generations of visitors to the old National Museum may remember the awesome baleen whale exhibit hanging from the ceiling.This whale was stranded at Malacca in June 1892 and was given to Malaysia in 1974. When the new natural history museum was mooted,  there were plans to bring the whale back to Singapore. But in an ironic twist of fate, news of Jubilee’s stranding was to change the course of Singapore’s natural history forever.  

Aileen

Sculptor Ms Aileen Toh with her masterpiece during the repository on 11 April 2016. Photo by Chia Han Shen.

Upon hearing the news, Aileen Toh, a self-taught wood sculptor from the Sculpture Society of Singapore (SSS) decided to craft a beautiful and fitting tribute to Jubilee.  Ms Toh constructed a whale sculpture titled “Swim Ashore” using recycled wood from an old saga tree in Fort Canning Park. Her source of inspiration and admiration for the whale came from a sense of intrigue. As she pondered, “why would a large sea creature be found in the shallow waters of Jurong Island”, let alone Singapore?

Asked to describe what feelings she expresses when she sculpts. She says it depends on what she wants to raise awareness for. Ms Toh loves to sculpt things related to our natural environment. With “Swim Ashore”, she hopes to inspire people to be “loving and protecting the environment so that sea creatures have a lovely habitat to live in”.

Constructing the Whale

This collaboration between the National Parks Board (NParks) and SSS took place at the Wood Sculpture Symposium 2016 from 21 – 25 January 2016, where sculptors participated in transforming dead trees into beautiful sculptures. In nature nothing goes to waste, and that is where the beauty of nature lies.

Working tirelessly from 9-5, Ms Toh put in more than 40 hours of work into the creation of the sculpture, including preparing the wood block from a 30 m Saga tree that was removed from Fort Canning as it was old, termite infested, and posed a risk to park users. 

It was an arduous task, but she was thankfully supported by dedicated NParks staff, SSS members, students, and volunteers.   

Ms Toh was grateful that “NParks could arrange for people to assist in separating parts from the larger chunks of wood”. A strenuous effort that required manpower to firstly turn over the whale and a larger chain saw to “carve out the belly”.  A final coat of lacquer was painted to protect the sculpture from the elements and to give it a shiny finish.

At the end of the symposium, Ms Toh was happy for all the support that she received from sculpture students and for NPark’s support during the event. But that was not to be the end or the final resting place for the wooden whale. The guest of honour at the Symposium, Paul Tan, deputy CEO of the National Arts Council, then made the suggestion that the sculpture should be offered to LKCNHM.

 

The Move to LKCNHM

Preparations for the move then were made after Ms Toh contacted Professor Peter Ng, the head of LKCNHM, to donate her artwork to the museum. It was a mammoth task, but made light thanks to the movers from Rhema.  Heavy machinery such as the lorry crane was used to seamlessly and safely move the wooden whale to its new home . The sculpture was unveiled on the lawn of the LKCNHM on 19 February 2016.

Ms Toh still has a sense of excitement, and is “glad and honoured to have her masterpiece in the museum” alongside Jubilee. Delightedly, she exclaims “the museum is the best place this sculpture can be placed at”.

Although the whale was placed on the museum’s lawn, concerns were later raised that termites could destroy the sculpture and that the wood would decompose faster if it were left on the soil. A decision was made to move the model once more, this time onto the paved walkway. This provided Ms Toh a chance to trim, sand, and varnish the belly.

 

On 11 April 2016, the same team from Rhema helped out with the repository of the whale. The move took 5.5 hours of reshuffling and adjustments as it was at risk of being damaged should people mishandle it. The solution was to set cement to adhere and hold the sculpture to prevent further movement.

Despite the difficulties that beset the wooden whale, Toh’s message remains the same.  The sculpture’s plaque captures the undeterred optimism for us to appreciate and protect the fragile marine biological environment. “How did a deep sea creature end up near our offshore island? In my opinion, the marine biological environment and human activities are closely related. Ergo, the causes of their death are food for thought.”

Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore available in stores

Back by popular demand—Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore is on its second print run!

Temasekia cover

The book is now available at the LKCNHM Museum Shop, NUS Multi-Purpose Co-operative Society Ltd (Science, LT27), Kinokuniya SingaporeSelect Books and Nature’s Niche.

More about the book:

Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore celebrates the biodiversity of Singapore and discoveries throughout the nation’s history. The species featured in this book were described from specimens collected from Singapore, with some bearing a scientific name related to the history, geography, folklore or cultural heritage of Singapore. A select few are found only in Singapore and nowhere else in the world. All these organisms are the life and soul of the land first known as Temasek, which was the earliest name of the island and settlement located on the present day Singapore. These are the “original Singaporeans”.

Lunar New Year Promotion 2016: Return of the Museum Roundtable Red Packet Giveaway

Update: Thank you for your interest in the Museum Roundtable Lunar New Year red packets!

All LKCNHM red packets have been fully redeemed.

Meanwhile, visitors are welcomed to recreate impressions of the red packets with the orangutan in the Biodiversity Gallery, and find out the reason for his expression.

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“Based on the incoming zodiac animal for the New Year, participating Museum Roundtable members would distribute their own uniquely designed red packets to visitors of their museums and galleries during this festive season.

Collect these limited edition red packets while stocks last!*”

The Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum’s exclusive red packet features a primate doing one of the favourite activities of visitors in our gallery with a museum exhibit! Come collect a red packet and do the same before they get snapped up!

LKCNHM Red packet

*Terms and conditions apply.

Free gallery tours at the LKCNHM by volunteer guides

We are pleased to offer free gallery tours at the museum from Thursday 14 January 2016. These tours would be conducted by our team of enthusiastic volunteer guides.

Tours run for one hour, commencing at 1 pm, and are available to the public from Thursdays to Sundays (excluding public holidays).

The tours are restricted to a maximum of 12 persons per group, on a first-come-first-served basis. Do enquire at the front-of-house counter when you visit the museum on tour days!

Volunteer tour 1

Spot us in the National University of Singapore, Faculty of Science Annual Report 2014/2015!

The museum is proud to be prominently featured in the NUS Faculty of Science Annual Report 2014/2015. You can see photographs taken in and around the museum across the report, including our mural of specimens that was used as the backdrop of the Deanery Team.

Read the report here, or download it here.

002 20160111 FOS Annual Report 1 F T

 

Results of ExxonMobil Endangered Biodiversity and Conservation Programme Documentary Making Competition

The ExxonMobil Endangered Biodiversity and Conservation Programme aims to increase public biodiversity and conservation awareness of Singapore and Southeast Asian biodiversity. Sponsored by ExxonMobil, participants get to attend a customised workshop on Southeast Asian biodiversity conservation, and do their part in spreading conservation awareness.

Endangered species and conservation design

Secondary school participants are encouraged to take positive action and spread the conservation message by taking part in a documentary making competition.

These videos showcase the winners of the documentary making competition in the Secondary School category.

First place: Greenview Secondary School, Group 4, featuring the Sumatran rhinoceros. The team members are: Lim Zhi Xin, Lookhanumanjao Chatchaya, Wayne Song Wan You and Li Wanjun Alyssa.

 

Second place: NUS High School of Mathematics and Science, Group 8, featuring the Sunda pangolin. The team members are: Soundarajan Keerthana, Zen Hoi and Jin XunZe.

 

Third place: Evergreen Secondary School, Group 5, featuring the Sunda pangolin. The team members are: Chua Jia Hao Collister, Lee Guo Rui, Lawrence Caisip and Tan Wei Xiang.

 

We hope that these videos will encourage everyone to learn more about Southeast Asian conservation and associated issues.

For more information about the ExxonMobil Endangered Biodiversity and Conservation Programme for primary and secondary schools, contact nhmlearning@nus.edu.sg.

Celebrate Singapore’s Biodiversity at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum this December!

Update [30 Dec]: All copies of Temasekia have been fully redeemed. Limited copies of Stacey Goes to the LKCNHM are going fast.

We bring you the gift of books in celebration of SG50!

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From Friday 18 Dec 2015
First 2,000 gallery visitors will receive the Celebrating Singapore’s Natural Heritage trail guide and activity book to explore our rich biodiversity through the museum’s gallery containing some 2,000 specimens.

From Saturday 26 Dec 2015
Launch and gift of 2 new books on Singapore’s natural heritage and the LKCNHM: Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore, and Stacey Goes to the LKCNHM.

Terms and conditions:
Each adult ticket can be exchanged for Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore, while a child ticket can be exchanged for Stacey Goes to the LKCNHM. One ticket is exchangeable for one book only. LKCNHMember (Individual), and NUS staff and students can receive 1 copy of Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore. LKCNHMember (Family) can receive one copy of Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore and Stacey Goes to the LKCNHM. LKCNHMember (Corporate) can receive one copy of Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore per card per visit. Limited books available on a first come first served basis.

Information about the books:

Celebrating Singapore Natural Heritage

Celebrating Singapore’s Natural Heritage trail and activity book is produced by the museum’s outreach and education unit for visitors (age 3 and up). It aims to raise awareness about the rich biodiversity in Singapore.

Stacey goes to LKCNHM

Stacey Goes to the LKCNHM by Lianne Ong is the forth book of the Stacey and the Museums series. In this new adventure, she explores the exhibits in the natural history museum and learns secrets from the past. Recommended for children (age 3–7).

Temasekia

Temasekia: 50 Plants and Animals Native to Singapore is written by LKCNHM staff and researchers in Singapore and introduces the biodiversity and discoveries in Singapore. The species featured in the book were described from specimens collected from Singapore or bear a name related to the country. Some are found nowhere else in the world!

Volunteer with us: Be a LKCNHM Gallery guide!

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Are you:

  1. a believer of lifelong learning?
  2. interested in sharing your knowledge of natural history and heritage with museum visitors from all walks of life?

Be a part of LKCNHM’s volunteer gallery guide family

The LKCNHM Gallery Guiding Programme aims to support the gallery and Museum by training guides to provide an enhanced visitor experience for our large and diverse audience. We hope this will inspire a life-long commitment and understanding to the natural world.

Details

Role: Gallery guide at Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum

Purpose and responsibilities: To enhance visitor experience by interacting with the public and giving them more information about the various exhibits and the biodiversity and heritage galleries

Commitment: At least a year

Day/time: Any day except Mondays, for four hours per session

Frequency: At least once a month

Skills and qualification: No particular skills, experience or qualifications needed!  However, essential criteria are:

  1. keen interest in natural history and heritage,
  2. willingness to make a commitment,
  3. enjoy sharing information with, and enthusing people.

Training: In-house training will be provided over the course of a month (approximately 15 hours). This includes orientation and introduction to the museum, gallery familiarisation, effective guiding techniques (communications skills and questioning strategies), interacting with visitors, zone specialisation, learning from objects, script development, health and safety and gallery procedures.

The training schedule can be viewed here.

Interviews: Interviews will be conducted on the second week of August. We will be in touch as soon as we can to schedule it.

Are you ready? Register now!