Research visit by Arlo Hinckley Boned

Earlier this week, we hosted a research visit by Mr. Arlo Hinckley Boned, who came to collect data from the mammals in the Zoological Reference Collection.


Arlo and a red giant flying squirrel collected by Charles Hose.

Arlo hails from the Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics Group of the Doñana Biological Station in Spain, and is working on the diversity of shrews and gymnures across biogeographical realms for his Phd thesis.

He recently completed four months of fieldwork in Borneo, sampling areas in Sabah, Malaysia, for small mammals. During this period, he shared that he lost a total of 9 kg from the intense fieldwork, but gained interesting insights on the distribution and diversity of the mammals there. Arlo maintains the Small Mammals of Borneo blog with his colleagues where they share about small mammals and their field experience.

As his research group is particularly interested in the diversity of vertebrates in the Sunda shelf, Arlo also examined specimens of the red giant flying squirrel (Petaurista petaurista) in addition to gymnures and moonrats. On his last day, Arlo was particularly excited to come across a red giant flying squirrel specimen collected by Charles Hose, a prominent zoologist and British colonial administrator.

We wish Arlo all the best for the rest of his work in the region.

[Research highlight] Making its way down the Peninsula: Discovery of the non-native snail Cryptozona siamensis in Singapore

A new discovery by museum scientists and their collaborators of an introduced snail in Singapore was recently published in Occasional Molluscan Papers. We asked them to tell us more about the significance of their findings:

History is repeating itself. Another alien snail—Cryptozona siamensis—has made its way to Singapore. Several months ago, this species, which is native to Thailand, was recently found in Singapore. The snail is believed to have been accidentally introduced through horticultural trade activities. Presently the snails appears to be confined to a single locality in Mandai, which was formerly a plant nursery.


Cryptozona siamensis at Mandai. Photo by Tan Siong Kiat.

This follows the 2011 discovery of Limicolaria flammea (a native of East Africa), in Singapore. Despite efforts to prevent the spread of that earlier invader, the snail is now found across Singapore.

spot the diff snails_TSK.jpg

Spot the difference: three species of land snails found at Mandai, Sarika sp. (left), Cryptozona siamensis (middle), Quantula striata (right). Photo by Tan Siong Kiat.

The discovery of both species highlights the importance of being able to tell different species apart (also known as taxonomy). Both non-native snails superficially resemble species already known from Singapore. They may have gone unnoticed for much longer if researchers had not been actively studying Singapore’s fauna.


Although the introduction of a snail may seem harmless, it is known among researchers that introduced species can pose a threat to native biodiversity greater than most people realise. Worldwide, many native species are endangered because of the negative impacts brought about by introduced species. Besides being a possible plant pest, studies in Thailand have shown that Cryptozona siamensis can carry parasites that may infect humans; usually occur through ingestion of raw or undercooked snails or contaminated vegetables.


Limicolaria flammea.
Photo by Tan Siong Kiat.

So far in Singapore, Limicolaria flammea has not done the same damage some of its close relatives have wreaked in other parts of the world, and the situation for Cryptozona siamensis is as yet unknown. While the news of yet another introduced species is typically bad news, there are documented cases of successful eradication of introduced species in other countries, especially if discovered quickly and action is promptly taken. In additional to physical removal and the tightening of measures to prevent accidental importation of non-native species, the public can play a big role by getting to know the local fauna and to keep an eye out for invaders. It is hoped that the relevant authorities will step up efforts to eradicate this snail based on the precautionary principle.

Let us do what we can to prevent history from repeating itself.

Original paper:
Tan, S.K., Chan S.Y., Nguang L.H.S. & Low M.E.Y. (2016). Making its way down the Peninsula: Discovery of the non-native Cryptozona siamensis (L. Pfeiffer, 1856) in Singapore, with a note on its status in Peninsular Malaysia (Helicarionoidea: Ariophantidae). Occasional Molluscan Papers 5: 1–9.

Contribution by Tan Siong Kiat and Martyn E.Y. Low

LKCNHM on the News: Great travel deals ignite wanderlust

The 42nd edition of the MATTA Fair in Kuala Lumpur featured a total of 1,212 booths by more than 900 exhibitors.

The Singapore Tourism Board marked its return to the fair after a three-year hiatus with a wide range of exciting travel packages.

“We’re taking the opportunity to introduce the latest attractions at the fair due to recent developments in Singapore,” said Singapore Tourism Board International Group Malaysia area director Serene Woon.

“Among them are the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, which is also featuring three sets of dinosaur fossils, and the National Gallery Singapore, the largest venue for South-East Asian art.

“The idea is not only to offer families a fun holiday, but also an enriching experience for the children so that they learn something as well,” she explained.

Read more here:

Copyright of Star Media Group Berhad



Job Opportunity: Scientific Officer (Publications)

We are looking for a full-time Scientific Officer to work on our in-house publications.


The Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM), which is located in the National University of Singapore, is Singapore’s only natural history museum. We are looking for a self-motivated and hands-on individual who is responsible for copy-editing and publication of the museum’s scientific and general publications, which includes manuscripts for the Raffles Bulletin of Zoology, Nature in Singapore, LKCNHM eBooks, etc., as well as brochures and museum newsletters. The officer also is to provide administrative support in the handling and processing of manuscript submissions, and manage the online resources and publicity for the museum’s publications.


  • Relevant Bachelor’s degree (i.e., Life Sciences, English, Journalism).
  • Very good command of the English language.
  • Excellent organizational skills and detail-oriented approach to work.
  • Good knowledge of scientific writing (organismal biology) is an advantage.
  • Adept at use of basic software such as MS Word and Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator.
  • Basic knowledge of HTML, website management (some experience with blogging).
  • Able to maintain a professional standard of work, even with looming deadlines.
  • Works well in a team.

To apply, go to:

A tribute to Mr. S.R. Nathan—a patron we will remember

We extend our deepest condolences to the family of our former President, Mr. S.R. Nathan, who was an important benefactor to NUS and the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM). We remember him fondly as a champion for Singapore’s natural environment and education, and his crucial role in supporting the museum’s transformation to what it is today. He was also a patron to the museum’s tome, Singapore Biodiversity: An Encyclopedia of the Natural Environment and Sustainable Development, and helped kick start the fund raising effort to set up the Leo Tan Professorship in Biodiversity for the museum to honour Professor Leo Tan.

Head of LKCNHM, Prof Peter Ng penned the following tribute to the late Mr. S.R. Nathan:

He was just a man. Like all of us. But what a man he was. A people’s president in his tenure… not just in name, but in deeds, and most importantly, in heart. A soft-spoken man with a sage’s temperament and a resolve of steel. A man who instinctively knew what was right or wrong, and lived by these basic principles… even when the world he lived in rarely cared. He was a man who made any man or woman proud to be a Singaporean. And we were proud he was our President.

NUS and the Lee Kong Chian Natural History owe him a debt we cannot repay. As our patron, he shared his wisdom whenever we needed it. Encouraged and helped us to reach heights we thought were impossible. And when we succeeded in spite of everything, he reminded us that success was not an endgame. He counseled that it must be tempered with humility—that we who have succeeded must help those who have not, have less, or have a harder time. That we must endeavour and continue to engage Singaporeans. All Singaporeans.

He will be missed. He is already missed. Thank you sir and rest well. We will remember.

LKCNHM Ground Breaking

LKCNHM Ground Breaking ceremony on 11 Jan 2013. Mr. S.R. Nathan is seated second from left.

Visit from old friends: the Orchards

We begin this month with another crustacean themed post — a report on the visit of Max and Beverly Orchard on their first visit to our new building!

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The Orchards during their recent visit. Photo by Tan Heok Hui.

Max was the Chief Ranger of Christmas Island National Park prior to retirement, and author of ‘Crabs of Christmas Island‘. Given his fondness of crabs, it was only natural that he and Prof. Peter Ng forged a strong collaboration. The Orchards have been a focal part of the Museum’s expeditions to Christmas and Cocos (Keeling) Islands from 2010 to 2012, culminating in a supplement in the Raffles Bulletin of Zoology highlighting the Biodiversity and Management Challenges of both islands. It yielded many new discoveries of crustacean species both on land and out at sea. See more examples from our old blog here.


The Christmas Island/Cocos Keeling 2012 Team. From left: J.C. Mendoza, Tan Siong Kiat, Naruse Tohru, Joelle Lai, Tan Heok Hui, Peter Ng, Leo Tan, Fujita Yoshihisa with Christmas Islands Parks Officer, Max Orchard (third from right).

Amongst the discoveries in the anchialine caves on Christmas Island, were two new species, named Orcovita orchardorum  and Orcovita hicksi. These two crabs were the first record Orcovita in the Indian Ocean and Australia.

It was a good afternoon of catching up, and planning future research trips to Christmas Island. We miss Christmas Island very much, and hope to be back soon!

Orcovita orchardorum was named in honour of the Orchards who have been dedicated their lives spearheading conservation initiatives to safeguard the island’s unique biodiversity.

red crab Max orchard

Christmas Island’s world famous red crabs (Gecarcoidea natalis). Photo by Max Orchard.

Job Opportunity: Scientific Manager

We are looking for a Scientific Manager to join the Outreach and Education Unit (OEU).


  1. Actively sourcing and securing customers and business for the outreach and educational programmes of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM).
  2. Actively sourcing and securing sponsorships from external organisations for the outreach and educational programmes of LKCNHM.
  3. Manage and lead the Outreach and Education Unit (OEU) to coordinate and conduct gallery tours, workshops, guided nature walks and other education and outreach programmes
  4. Manage and handle enquiries regarding the OEU
  5. Working with senior management to develop new and feasible programmes for the LKCNHM
  6. Manage and conduct existing and new education programmes
  7. Work closely with the LKCNHM Front-of-House to handle guided gallery tours
  8. Manage educational webpages on museum’s website and other advertisements on the outreach and educational programmes of LKCNHM
  9. Recruit and conduct training for volunteers and guides whenever necessary
  10. May involve participation in research work and field trips/expeditions



  1. Preferred Master’s degree in Science from a recognised university, majoring in Biology, Zoology, Botany or equivalent.
  2. Minimum 5 years of experience as an educator (relevant experience in teaching, conducting workshops and guiding field trips), with proven leadership experience.
  3. Good knowledge of biology, nature and Singapore and Southeast Asian biodiversity.
  4. Experience in a museum or public attraction, business development, public relations and marketing experience will be an asset. Must be able to work on weekends (Saturdays and Sundays), public holidays and irregular hours as and when required.
  5. Able to work independently, possess good problem solving skills, resourceful, and crisis management skills
  6. Excellent interpersonal skills, even temperament, ability to lead and supervise effectively.
  7. Possesses ability to effectively and professionally communicate at all levels, both verbal and written wise.
  8. Demonstrated strong leadership, organizational and management skills.
  9. Demonstrated ability to handle fast paced environment with many unpredictable developments and rapid changes.


Job: Executive and Professional

Schedule:  Full-time – Fixed Term (Contract)


Application will end on 13th July 2016. Interviews will be held from end July.

Only shortlisted candidates will be notified.
To apply, go to:

A Crabby Acquisition

Here at the museum, most of our specimens are collected from the research field, received through donations from other museums, or via reports of dead animals by the public.

In some instances, we also collect specimens through more ‘conventional’ means — the market! In fact, we often make it a point to visit local markets in our various field sites across Southeast Asia, as you never know what interesting critter will pop up. After all, the Sulawesi Coelacanth (Latimeria menadoensis), was discovered by Dr. Mark Erdmann in a Manado fish market while on his honeymoon!

Recently, Prof Peter Ng, LKCNHM head, collected an interesting specimen through similar means. He was having dinner at Turf City one evening when he came across an interesting live crab in one of the aquariums, and promptly bought the crab from the seafood joint. Saved from a certain fate of ending up on a dinner plate, the specimen was instead destined for the collection shelves at the museum.

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Top, bottom and close up views of the Golden King Crab. Photo by Tan Heok Hui.

This crab was later identified as a Golden King Crab (Lithodes aequispinus). According to Prof Ng, adults of this species can be as large, if not larger than their more famous counterparts, the Alaskan King Crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus).

Even though it looks crab-like, it is not a ‘true’ crab but actually related to hermit crabs. If you are confused, count the number of legs seen in this crab, and compare it with the mangrove mud crab, Scylla spp.  :)

The crab’s origins were even more of a surprise as it was said to be from Korea, and if so, may be the first record of the species there.

Golden king crabs are not only found in East Asian waters which includes countries like South Korea, but can also be found in the Northern Pacific Ocean ranging from British Columbia in Canada all the way to Japan.

The crab is now awaiting final preparations at our laboratory before it is added to our wet collections along with other crustacean specimens. It will be invaluable as a future research specimen for comparative work and DNA studies.

The next time you visit a market, keep your eyes peeled out for interesting and unusual animals — they may be right under your nose!